Awards and Recipients

The Nita B Kibble Literary Awards for Women Writers recognise the works of women writers who have published fiction or non-fiction classified as 'life writing'. This includes novels, autobiographies, biographies, literature and any writing with a strong personal element.

The object of the Awards is to encourage Australian women writers to improve and advance Australian literature for the benefit of the community.

 

Two awards are made each year, the Kibble Literary Award and the Dobbie Literary Award, which are known by writers, publishers and the wider literary community as an exciting feature on the annual calendar of women's writing.

 >2018 Kibble Literary Awards for Women Writers - Media Release

View the full list of shortlisted authors and prize winners since the first Kibble Literary Awards in 1994.

2018 Kibble Literary Award for an established author

Maxine Beneba Clarke

The Hate Race

BIOGRAPHY:

Maxine Beneba Clarke is a widely published Australian writer of Afro-Caribbean descent. Maxine's short fiction, non-fiction and poetry have been published in numerous publications including OverlandThe AgeMeanjinThe Saturday Paper and The Big Issue. Her critically acclaimed short fiction collection Foreign Soil won the ABIA for Literary Fiction Book of the Year 2015 and the 2015 Indie Book Award for Debut Fiction, and was shortlisted for the Matt Richell Award for New Writing at the 2015 ABIAs and the 2015 Stella Prize. She was also named as one of the Sydney Morning Herald's Best Young Novelists for 2015. Maxine has published three poetry collections including Carrying the World, which won the Victorian Premier's Literary Award for Poetry 2017 and was shortlisted for the Colin Roderick Award. The Hate Race, a memoir about growing up black in Australia won the NSW Premier's Literary Award Multicultural NSW Award 2017 and was shortlisted for an ABIA, an Indie Award, the Victorian Premier's Literary Awards and Stella Prize. The Patchwork Bike, Maxine's first picture book with Van T. Rudd was a CBCA Honour Book for 2017.

SYNOPSIS:

‘Against anything I had ever been told was possible, I was turning white. On the surface of my skin, a miracle was quietly brewing . . .’

Suburban Australia. Sweltering heat. Three bedroom blonde-brick. Family of five. Beat-up Ford Falcon. Vegemite on toast. Maxine Beneba Clarke's life is just like all the other Aussie kids on her street. Except for this one, glaring, inescapably obvious thing.

From one of Australia's most exciting writers, and the author of the multi-award-winning Foreign Soil, comes The Hate Race: a powerful, funny, and at times devastating memoir about growing up black in white middle-class Australia.

 

 

Helen Garner

Everywhere I Look

BIOGRAPHY:

Helen Garner writes novels, stories, screenplays and works of non-fiction. In 2006 she received the inaugural Melbourne Prize for Literature, and in 2016 she won the prestigious Windham-Campbell Prize for non-fiction and the Western Australian Premier’s Book Award. Her book of essays Everywhere I Look won the 2017 Indie Book Award for Non-Fiction.

SYNOPSIS:

I pedal over to Kensington just after dark. As I roll along the lane towards the railway underpass, a young Asian woman on her way home from the station walks out of the tunnel towards me. After she passes there’s a stillness, a moment of silent freshness that feels like spring.

 

Helen Garner is one of Australia’s greatest writers. Her short non-fiction has enormous range. Spanning fifteen years of work, Everywhere I Look is a book full of unexpected moments, sudden shafts of light, piercing intuition, flashes of anger and incidental humour. It takes us from backstage at the ballet to the trial of a woman for the murder of her newborn baby. It moves effortlessly from the significance of moving house to the pleasure of re-reading Pride and Prejudice.

 

Everywhere I Look includes Garner’s famous and controversial essay on the insults of age, her deeply moving tribute to her mother and extracts from her diaries, which have been part of her working life for as long as she has been a writer. Everywhere I Look glows with insight. It is filled with the wisdom of life.

 

Michelle de Kretser 

The Life to Come

Michelle de Kretser

BIOGRAPHY:

Michelle de Kretser was born in Sri Lanka and emigrated to Australia when she was 14. Educated in Melbourne and Paris, Michelle has worked as a university tutor, an editor and a book reviewer. She is the author of The Rose GrowerThe Hamilton Case, which won the Commonwealth Prize (SE Asia and Pacific region) and the UK Encore Prize, and The Lost Dog, which was widely praised by writers such as AS Byatt, Hilary Mantel and William Boyd and won a swag of awards, including: the 2008 NSW Premier's Book of the Year Award and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction, and the 2008 ALS Gold Medal. The Lost Dog was also shortlisted for the Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction, the Western Australian Premier's Australia-Asia Literary Award, the Commonwealth Writers' Prize (Asia-Pacific Region) and Orange Prize's Shadow Youth Panel. It was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Orange Prize for Fiction. Her last novel, Questions of Travel, received 14 honours, including winning the 2013 Miles Franklin Literary Award.

SYNOPSIS:

The dazzling new novel from Michelle de Kretser, author of Questions of Travel, bestseller and winner of the Miles Franklin Award.

Set in Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka, The Life to Come is a mesmerising novel about the stories we tell and don't tell ourselves as individuals, as societies and as nations. It feels at once firmly classic and exhilaratingly contemporary.

Pippa is a writer who longs for success. Celeste tries to convince herself that her feelings for her married lover are reciprocated. Ash makes strategic use of his childhood in Sri Lanka but blots out the memory of a tragedy from that time. Driven by riveting stories and unforgettable characters, here is a dazzling meditation on intimacy, loneliness and our flawed perception of other people.

Profoundly moving as well as wickedly funny, The Life to Come reveals how the shadows cast by both the past and the future can transform, distort and undo the present. This extraordinary novel by Miles Franklin-winning author Michelle de Kretser will strike to your soul. 

 

Fiona McFarlane

The High Places

BIOGRAPHY:

Fiona McFarlane was born in Sydney, and has degrees in English from Sydney University and Cambridge University, and an MFA from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was a Michener Fellow. Her work has been published in Zoetrope: All-Story, Southerly, the Best Australian Stories and the New Yorker, and she has received fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Phillips Exeter Academy and the Australia Council for the Arts. The Night Guest, her debut novel, has sold into fifteen territories around the world. She lives in Sydney.

SYNOPSIS:

The Night Guest introduced an Australian writer 'with the promise of literary greatness' (Los Angeles Times). The High Places delivers on that promise.

The dazzling stories in this collection find those moments when people confront the strangeness and mystery of their lives. The revelations of intimidating old friends on holiday. An accident on a dark country road. A marine biologist in conversation with the ghost of Charles Darwin. The sudden arrival of American parachutists in a Queensland country town. A lottery win. A farmer troubled by miracles in the middle of a drought . . . The people in The High Places are jolted into seeing themselves from a fresh and often disconcerting perspective.

Ranging around the world from a remote Pacific island to outback Australia to the tourist haunts of Greece, these stories are written with extraordinary invention, great emotional insight and wry humour. Each one of them is as rich and rewarding as literature can be.

Vanessa Berry - Mirror Sydney (Giramondo Publishing)

Judith Brett - The Enigmatic Mr Deakin (Text Publishing)

Maxine Beneba Clarke - The Hate Race (Hachette Australia)

Helen Garner - Everywhere I Look (Text Publishing)

Michelle de Kretser - The Life to Come (Allen & Unwin)

Sofie Laguna - The Choke (Allen & Unwin)

Fiona McFarlane - The High Places (Penguin Random House)

Sonya Voumard - The Media and the Massacre (Transit Lounge Publishing)

2018 Dobbie Literary Award for a first time published author

Madelaine Dickie

Troppo

BIOGRAPHY:

Madelaine Dickie studied Creative Arts and Journalism at the University of Wollongong. Her writing has appeared in numerous publications including GriffithREVIEW , the American journal Creative Nonfiction and Hecate, and her radio stories have been broadcast on Radio National. In 2011 Madelaine received a Prime Minister’s Australia Asia Endeavour Award to move to West Java, Indonesia, where she worked with mentors at Universitas Padjadjaran and Universitas Islam Bandung to complete her first novel, Troppo.

Since publishing Troppo, Madelaine has returned to Indonesia as a guest of the Makassar Writer’s Festival in Sulawesi and travelled to Japan on an Asialink residency to work on a new novel Red Can Origami, about a bitter conflict between a Japanese-owned uranium company and an Aboriginal group in northern Australia. Madelaine currently lives in Exmouth, Western Australia.

SYNOPSIS:

In Troppo Penny is in Indonesia drifting, partying, hanging out – a thousand miles away from claustrophobic Perth and her career-minded boyfriend. But things take a dangerous turn when she goes to work at Shane’s Sumatran Oasis. Caught up in local hostility directed at Shane, and flirting and surfing with the hell-man Matt, Penny soon finds herself swept into a world where two very different cultures must collide. The Weekend Australian said Troppo was particularly sharp in ‘its abstract yet precise evocations of the sensory overload of Indonesia and in its dense, poetic riffs on the almost narcotic pull of chasing waves’. The Sydney Morning Herald praised it’s ‘finely drawn characters’ while the Jakarta Post praised it for its ‘sinewy take on the people next door seeing Indonesians as humans … not economic government units’.

 

Sarah Krasnostein

The Trauma Cleaner

Sarah Krasnostein

BIOGRAPHY:

Sarah Krasnostein was born in America, studied in Melbourne and has lived and worked in both countries. She is a law lecturer and researcher with a doctorate in criminal law. Her first book, The Trauma Cleaner, won the Victorian Prize for Literature and the Prize for Non-Fiction in the 2018 Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards, and won General Non-Fiction Book of the Year in the 2018 Australian Book Industry Awards. Sarah lives in Melbourne and spends part of the year working in New York City.

SYNOPSIS:

Before she was a trauma cleaner, Sandra Pankhurst was many things: husband and father, drag queen, gender reassignment patient, sex worker, small businesswoman, trophy wife…

But as a little boy, raised in violence and excluded from the family home, she just wanted to belong. Now she believes her clients deserve no less.

A woman who sleeps among garbage she has not put out for forty years. A man who bled quietly to death in his loungeroom. A woman who lives with rats, random debris and terrified delusion. The still life of a home vacated by accidental overdose.

Sarah Krasnostein has watched the extraordinary Sandra Pankhurst bring order and care to these, the living and the dead—and the book she has written is equally extraordinary. Not just the compelling story of a fascinating life among lives of desperation, but an affirmation that, as isolated as we may feel, we are all in this together.

 

Micheline Lee 

The Healing Party

BIOGRAPHY:

Born in Malaysia, Micheline Lee migrated to Melbourne when she was eight. After completing a law degree she lived in Darwin for fifteen years. Her first job was as a criminal prosecutor and her next job was as a painter, holding exhibitions in Australia and overseas. Micheline now lives in Melbourne with her partner and son, and continues to alternate between art and the law. The Healing Party is her first novel.

SYNOPSIS:

Estranged from her family, Natasha is making a life for herself in Darwin when her sister calls with bad news. Their mother is ill, and has only a few months to live. Confused and conflicted, Natasha returns to the home she fled many years before. But her father, an evangelical Christian, has not changed –he is still the domineering yet magnetic man she ran from, and her sisters and mother are still in his thrall.

One night her father makes an astonishing announcement: he has received a message from God that his wife is to be healed, and they must hold a party to celebrate. As Natasha and her sisters prepare for the big event – and the miracle – she struggles to reconcile her family’s faith with her sense that they are pretending. Is she a traitor or the only one who can see the truth? And what use is truth anyway, in the face of death?

Taut, funny and poignant, The Healing Party is an electrifying debut novel about faith and lies, the spirit and the flesh.

 

Melanie Cheng - Australia Day (Text Publishing)

Madelaine Dickie - Troppo (Fremantle Press)

Jennifer Down - Our Magic Hour (Text Publishing)

Jessica Friedmann - Things That Helped (Scribe Publications)

Roanna Gonsalves - The Permanent Resident (UWA Publishing)

Eva De Jong-Duldig - Driftwood: Escape and Survival Through Art (Australian Scholarly Publishing)

Sarah Krasnostein - The Trauma Cleaner: One Woman’s Extraordinary Life in Death, Decay & Disaster (Text Publishing)

Micheline Lee - The Healing Party: A Novel (Black Inc Books)

Awards

The Kibble Literary Award, currently valued at $30,000, recognises the work of an established Australian woman writer.
The Dobbie Literary Award, currently valued at $5,000, recognises a first published work from an Australian woman writer.

The 2018 Kibble Awards longlist, shortlist and winners are decided by an expert judging panel consisting of:

  • Emeritus Professor Elizabeth Webby AM held the Chair of Australian Literature at Sydney University from 1990 to 2007. 
  • Dr Rachel Franks is a Coordinator, Education & Scholarship, State Library of New South Wales and a Conjoint Fellow, University of Newcastle, Australia.
  • Eleanor Limprecht is a writer, constant reader, writing teacher, critic and mother-of-two. She has published three novels, short fiction, book reviews, feature articles and essays.

> Applications for 2018 are now closed.

2016 Kibble Literary Award for an established author

Fiona Wright

Small Acts of Disappearance

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Fiona Wright is a highly regarded poet and critic, and her account of her illness is informed by a keen sense of its contradictions and deceptions, and by an awareness of the empowering effects of hunger, which is unsparing in its consideration of the author’s own actions and motivations. The essays offer perspectives on the eating disorder at different stages in Wright’s life, at university, where she finds herself in a radically different social world to the one she grew up in, in Sri Lanka as a fledgling journalist, in Germany as a young writer, in her hospital treatments back in Sydney. They combine research, travel writing, memoir, and literary discussions of how writers like Christina Stead, Carmel Bird, Tim Winton, John Berryman and Louise Glück deal with anorexia and addiction; together with accounts of family life, and detailed and humorous views of hunger-induced situations of the kind that are so compelling in Wright’s poetry. 

Fiona Wright’s poetry book Knuckled (Giramondo 2011) won the Dame Mary Gilmore Award for a first collection. Her poems and essays have been published in the Australian, Meanjin, Island, Overland, The Lifted Brow, Seizure and HEAT. 

With her debut volume of poetry Fiona Wright, who was born in 1983, joins a generation of exceptionally talented young Australian women poets…highly literate and exacting in their use of language, while being diverse in their voices and subject matter. The distinguishing characteristic of Wright’s poetry is a social sense, of families and people in a particular place and time.

SYNOPSIS:

These are essays of startling intelligence and honesty, brilliant meditations on hunger in all its forms and the complex nature of creative desire. 

 – CERIDWEN DOVEY 

Small Acts of Disappearance is a collection of ten essays that describes the author’s affliction with an eating disorder which begins in university, and escalates into life-threatening anorexia over the next ten years.



Elizabeth Harrower

A Few Days in the Country

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Elizabeth Harrower is the author of the novels Down in the City, The Long Prospect, The Catherine Wheel and The Watch Tower—all of which have been republished as Text Classics—and In Certain Circles, which was published in 2014 and shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction in 2015. Elizabeth lives in Sydney.

SYNOPSIS:

Internationally acclaimed for her five brilliant novels, Elizabeth Harrower is also the author of a small body of short fiction. A Few Days in the Country brings together for the first time her stories published in Australian journals in the 1960s and 1970s, along with those from her archives—including ‘Alice’, published for the first time in 2015 in the New Yorker. Essential reading for Harrower fans, these finely turned pieces show a broader range than the novels, ranging from caustic satires to gentler explorations of friendship. 


Drusilla Modjeska

Second Half First

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Drusilla Modjeska is one of Australia's most acclaimed writers. She was born in England but lived in Papua before arriving in Australia in 1971. Her books include Exiles at Home; the NSW Premier's Award-winning Poppy; Sisters, which she co-edited; the Nita B. Kibble, NSW Premier's Award and Australian Bookseller's Book of the Year Award-winner The Orchard; Timepieces; and Secrets with Robert Dessaix and Amanda Lohrey. She is also the author of the bestselling Stravinsky's Lunch and her first novel, The Mountain, which was shortlisted for the 2013 Miles Franklin Award, the Western Australia Premier's Award and the Barbara Jefferis Award.

SYNOPSIS:

A stunning new memoir from one of Australia's most highly acclaimed writers. 

Beginning with the disastrous events of the night before her fortieth birthday, in Second Half First Drusilla Modjeska looks back on the experiences of the past thirty years that have shaped her writing, her reading and the way she has lived. 

From a childhood in England, and her parents’ difficult marriage, to her time as a young newlywed living with her husband in Papua New Guinea; arriving as a single woman in Sydney in the 1970s and building close friendships with writers such as Helen Garner, with whom she lived in the bookish ‘house on the corner’, and the lovers who would – sometimes briefly – derail her, to returning to Papua thirty years later to found a literacy program, this new book by Drusilla Modjeska is an intensely personal and moving account of an examined life. 

In asking the candid questions that so many of us face – about love and independence, the death of a partner, growing older, the bonds of friendship and family – Drusilla Modjeska reassesses parts of her life, her work, the importance to her of writers such as Virginia Woolf and Simone de Beauvoir, among many others. The result is a memoir that is at once intellectually provocative and deeply honest; the book that readers of Poppy, The Orchard and Stravinsky’s Lunch have been waiting for.


Fiona Wright

Small Acts of Disappearance

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Fiona Wright is a highly regarded poet and critic, and her account of her illness is informed by a keen sense of its contradictions and deceptions, and by an awareness of the empowering effects of hunger, which is unsparing in its consideration of the author’s own actions and motivations. The essays offer perspectives on the eating disorder at different stages in Wright’s life, at university, where she finds herself in a radically different social world to the one she grew up in, in Sri Lanka as a fledgling journalist, in Germany as a young writer, in her hospital treatments back in Sydney. They combine research, travel writing, memoir, and literary discussions of how writers like Christina Stead, Carmel Bird, Tim Winton, John Berryman and Louise Glück deal with anorexia and addiction; together with accounts of family life, and detailed and humorous views of hunger-induced situations of the kind that are so compelling in Wright’s poetry. 

Fiona Wright’s poetry book Knuckled (Giramondo 2011) won the Dame Mary Gilmore Award for a first collection. Her poems and essays have been published in the Australian, Meanjin, Island, Overland, The Lifted Brow, Seizure and HEAT. 

With her debut volume of poetry Fiona Wright, who was born in 1983, joins a generation of exceptionally talented young Australian women poets…highly literate and exacting in their use of language, while being diverse in their voices and subject matter. The distinguishing characteristic of Wright’s poetry is a social sense, of families and people in a particular place and time.

SYNOPSIS:

These are essays of startling intelligence and honesty, brilliant meditations on hunger in all its forms and the complex nature of creative desire. 

 – CERIDWEN DOVEY 

Small Acts of Disappearance is a collection of ten essays that describes the author’s affliction with an eating disorder which begins in university, and escalates into life-threatening anorexia over the next ten years.



Debra Adelaide The Women’s Pages (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Tegan Bennett Daylight - Six Bedrooms (Random House Australia)

Elizabeth Harrower - A Few Days in the Country: And Other Stories (The Text Publishing Company)

Gail Jones - A Guide to Berlin (Random House Australia)

Drusilla Modjeska - Second Half First (Random House Australia)

Charlotte Wood - The Natural Way of Things (Allen & Unwin)

Fiona Wright - Small Acts of Disappearance (Giramondo Publishing)

2016 Dobbie Literary Award for a first time published author

Lucy Treloar

Salt Creek 

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Lucy Treloar was born in Malaysia and educated in England, Sweden and Melbourne. A graduate of the University of Melbourne and RMIT, Lucy is a writer and editor, and has plied her trades both in Australia and in Cambodia, where she lived for a number of years. Her short fiction has appeared in Sleepers, Overland, Seizure and Best Australian Stories 2013, and her non-fiction in a range of print media including The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald, Womankind, G Magazine, The West, Visit Cambodia, RAM and Gardening Australia. Her first novel, Salt Creek, was published by Picador in 2015. Lucy lives in inner Melbourne with her husband, four children and two whippets.

SYNOPSIS:

Salt Creek, 1855, lies at the far reaches of the remote, beautiful and inhospitable coastal region, the Coorong, in the new province of South Australia. The area, just opened to graziers willing to chance their luck, becomes home to Stanton Finch and his large family, including fifteen-year-old Hester Finch.

Once wealthy political activists, the Finch family has fallen on hard times. Cut adrift from the polite society they were raised to be part of, Hester and her siblings make connections where they can: with the few travellers that pass along the nearby stock route - among them a young artist, Charles - and the Ngarrindjeri people they have dispossessed. Over the years that pass, an Aboriginal boy, Tully, at first a friend, becomes part of the family.

Stanton's attempts to tame the harsh landscape bring ruin to the Ngarrindjeri people's homes and livelihoods, and unleash a chain of events that will tear the family asunder. As Hester witnesses the destruction of the Ngarrindjeri's subtle culture and the ideals that her family once held so close, she begins to wonder what civilization is. Was it for this life and this world that she was educated?


Shirley Barrett 

Rush Oh! 

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Shirley Barrett is best known for her work as a screenwriter and director. Shirley's first film, Love Serenade won the Camera D'Or (Best First Feature) at Cannes Film Festival in 1996. The script for her film South Solitary won the Queensland Premier's Prize (script) 2010, the West Australian Premier's Literary Prize (script) 2010, and the West Australian Premier's Prize 2010. Rush Oh! is Shirley's first novel. She lives in Sydney, Australia.

SYNOPSIS:

When Mary Davidson, the eldest daughter of a whaling family in Eden, New South Wales, sets out to chronicle the particularly difficult season of 1908, the story she tells is poignant and hilarious, filled with drama and misadventure. It's a season marked not only by the sparsity of whales and the vagaries of weather, but also by the arrival of John Beck, an itinerant whale man with a murky past, on whom Mary promptly develops an all-consuming crush. But hers is not the only romance to blossom amidst the blubber... Swinging from Mary's hopes and disappointments, both domestic and romantic, to the challenges that beset their tiny whaling operation, Rush Oh! is a celebration of an extraordinary episode in Australian history, when a family of whalers formed a fond, unique allegiance with a pod of frisky Killer whales - and in particular, a Killer whale named Tom.


Magda Szubanski 

Reckoning 

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Magda Szubanski is one of Australia’s best known and most loved performers. She began her career in university revues, then appeared in a number of sketch comedy shows before creating the iconic character of Sharon Strzelecki in ABC-TV’s Kath and Kim. She has also acted in films (Babe, Babe: Pig in the City, Happy Feet, The Golden Compass) and stage shows. Reckoning is her first book.

SYNOPSIS:

Heartbreaking, joyous, traumatic, intimate and revelatory, Reckoning is the book where Magda Szubanski, one of Australia’s most beloved performers, tells her story. 

In this extraordinary memoir, Magda describes her journey of self-discovery from a suburban childhood, haunted by the demons of her father’s espionage activities in wartime Poland and by her secret awareness of her sexuality, to the complex dramas of adulthood and her need to find out the truth about herself and her family. With courage and compassion she addresses her own frailties and fears, and asks the big questions about life, about the shadows we inherit and the gifts we pass on. 

Honest, poignant, utterly captivating, Reckoning announces the arrival of a fearless writer and natural storyteller. It will touch the lives of its readers.



Lucy Treloar

Salt Creek 

Kibble

BIOGRAPHY:

Lucy Treloar was born in Malaysia and educated in England, Sweden and Melbourne. A graduate of the University of Melbourne and RMIT, Lucy is a writer and editor, and has plied her trades both in Australia and in Cambodia, where she lived for a number of years. Her short fiction has appeared in Sleepers, Overland, Seizure and Best Australian Stories 2013, and her non-fiction in a range of print media including The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald, Womankind, G Magazine, The West, Visit Cambodia, RAM and Gardening Australia. Her first novel, Salt Creek, was published by Picador in 2015. Lucy lives in inner Melbourne with her husband, four children and two whippets.

SYNOPSIS:

Salt Creek, 1855, lies at the far reaches of the remote, beautiful and inhospitable coastal region, the Coorong, in the new province of South Australia. The area, just opened to graziers willing to chance their luck, becomes home to Stanton Finch and his large family, including fifteen-year-old Hester Finch.

Once wealthy political activists, the Finch family has fallen on hard times. Cut adrift from the polite society they were raised to be part of, Hester and her siblings make connections where they can: with the few travellers that pass along the nearby stock route - among them a young artist, Charles - and the Ngarrindjeri people they have dispossessed. Over the years that pass, an Aboriginal boy, Tully, at first a friend, becomes part of the family.

Stanton's attempts to tame the harsh landscape bring ruin to the Ngarrindjeri people's homes and livelihoods, and unleash a chain of events that will tear the family asunder. As Hester witnesses the destruction of the Ngarrindjeri's subtle culture and the ideals that her family once held so close, she begins to wonder what civilization is. Was it for this life and this world that she was educated?


Shirley Barrett - Rush Oh! (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Anna Broinowski - The Director is the Commander (Penguin)

Sonja Dechian - An Astronaut’s Life (The Text Publishing Company)

Amanda Hickie - An Ordinary Epidemic (MidnightSun Publishing)

Magda Szubanski - Reckoning: A Memoir (The Text Publishing Company)

Lucy Treloar - Salt Creek (Pan Macmillan Australia)

Lesley and Tammy Williams - Not Just Black and White (University of Queensland Press)